Read e-book online An Ambiguous Journey to the City: The Village and Other Odd PDF

By Ashis Nandy

ISBN-10: 0195683978

ISBN-13: 9780195683974

Divided into 4 sections, this ebook tells the tale of India's ambivalent affair with the fashionable urban throughout the delusion of the adventure among the village and the town, and the alterations that delusion has gone through. It loks on the vicissitudes of the metaphor of trip; profiles numerous heroes as they negotiate the transitions from the village to the town and again to the village; and specializes in the psychopathological trip from a poisoned village right into a self-annihilating urban.

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Throughout life Pramathesh admired his father Prabhatchandra, a learned man with an excellent knowledge of literature and classical music, a social reformer, a patron of education and music, and a builder. Prabhatchandra was fond and proud of his eldest son and heir, almost blindly so. H e granted Pramathesh enormous freedom from an early age and, afterwards, though often shocked by his son's chaotic marital life and financial ~roblems,Prabhatchandra continued to have faith in his unconventional but brilliant son.

52 The City as the Invitation to an Antique Death An Ambiguous Journey to the City supposed to narrate a novel, play or purana faithfully. This has spawned--film theorists like Dasgupta believe-a cinematic language that is never entirely independent of literature. ) One suspects that to the Bengalis at least, Devdas was Barua's book of life, perhaps even his autobiography written uncannily before his times by a gifted novelist. " But is its protagonist only a weakling who finds solace in drink?

It seemed as if popular markers of the hero aroused anxieties about sexual identity in him, and he had to try to reaffirm his masculinity in other areas of life. Barua's life was a bundle of paradoxes in other ways too. His interest in hunting went with a lifelong distaste for The City as the Invitation to an Antique Death 47 meat, fish and eggs (which he had probably picked up from his Vaishnava mother) and his conspicuously pacifist, almost ascetic style. After bagging a large number of heads, in later life he gave up hunting.

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An Ambiguous Journey to the City: The Village and Other Odd Ruins of the Self in the Indian Imagination by Ashis Nandy


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